Admin Login • Instructor Login • Student Login

Physics and Astronomy

Your Support

Small Sat Research Lab Hosts Women in Tech Workshop

June 5, 2017

Sixteen eighth grade females learned about CubeSats, soft circuits, 3D printing, and how to program micro controllers.

Group.png
The Small Satellite Research Laboratory hosted 16 eighth grade females from Madison County Middle School where they learned about CubeSats, soft circuits, 3D printing, and how to program micro controllers.

The Small Satellite Research Laboratory hosted a Women in Technology Workshop on May, 22 2017 for middle school females from Madison County Middle School with funding from the Office for Service Learning, the Physics & Astronomy Department, Dr. Thomas Mote, and the Franklin Office of Inclusion and Diversity Leadership. The workshop was run by SSRL members Dr. David L Cotten (Assistant Research Scientist, Center for Geospatial Research (CGR) in Geography), Paige Copenhaver (Undergraduate, Physics and Astronomy), Natalie Davis (Undergraduate, Computer Systems Engineering), Sydney Whilden (Undergraduate, Physics and Astronomy), Dr. Susanne Ullrich (Associate Professor, Physics and Astronomy), and Dr. Marguerite Madden (Professor of Geography and Director of CGR). 

The participants built their own 1U cardboard CubeSat’s using materials acquired from NASA and they learned about other small satellites, the two missions at UGA, and the capabilities of the lab. During their tour of the lab the students were able to see our 3D printers in action, learn how they work, and got to take home one of the 3D printed objects.

Students also learned about basic circuits and the emerging world of soft circuits. They designed and created bracelets that illuminated when attached to their wrists, allowing them to create their own personal designs while having to correctly sew/connect the different components of the circuit. The other project utilized LilyPad Arduino development boards, where they learned how to write code for the Arduino microprocessor. They programed the boards to play music, vibrate, make different LEDs flash, and even detect temperature. The students learned how to alter the programming of the Arduino so they could create their own projects after the workshop was completed.

Research

Research Centers

Latest Posts